Tag: free

Awakenings the Early Days by Ryan Phillips (Book Review)

Where and when have you felt most inspired?

For missionary and pastor Ryan Phillips, living in Hawaii was inspiring. Waking up to the sunrise, spending time in solitude with God, Ryan felt spiritually awakened, and he was inspired to journal his thoughts. Who wouldn’t feel energized, inspired, and refreshed by such a beautiful sight like this?

hawaii

You can just imagine the peace, quiet, and refreshment of your soul and mind in a place like this. Away from all the stress and cares that the daily grind would dictate.

Ryan’s early morning times of quiet may have first been self-published. They are now his new print book Awakenings The Early Days, published by Ambassador International. You can tell that Ryan has a desire to keep things Biblically correct, as every section of this book has sound doctrine. If the Bible is your boss, you may like what Ryan has to say. You can also tell that Ryan likes Old Testament stories, as he makes some references to Gideon, David, and Elijah – characters from the Bible that are real men’s men.

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Each page of Awakenings is similar to a devotion or a meditation. Overall, the book would have benefited from stronger editing, as some pages were completely full, while others were half-way empty. Was this out of a desire to just publish the first version of the writings as is, without changes? The result made the book look unfinished. There were also some sections where the meditation went over a page. The result was imbalance.

Ryan has a lot of positive things to say, but Awakenings could have benefited from a theme or a chronological order. Some devotions seemed to be going in more than one direction. The overall effect was that it seemed like a random collection of devotions put together, that still needed changes, before the final cut was ready to be released.

FTC Disclosure: I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. All opinions expressed here within this book review are my own.

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Tips for Homeschooling & Music

 

keys

Is it hard to believe that it’s back-to-school already? Believe it, friends.

The school year is young, so if you haven’t gotten back into the groove just yet, no worries. I have a freebie for you-  Oak Meadow’s  journal, Living Education . Oak Meadow is a school offering distance learning options for homeschoolers. The fall issue is out and it’s free online.

Plus… I offer up tips on page 20 on how to put some music in your daily rhythm.

 

How to Have a No-Spend Weekend

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If you’re accustomed to celebrating every weekend by spending money, it can be a challenge to change your ways if money gets tight. But if you set your mind to it, you can have a no-spend weekend- a weekend that doesn’t involve spending any money.

I’m what some call a house cat. I love to stay home. I like to relax, and now that it’s fall, I love to stay cozy. So for me, a no-spend weekend is no problem. But for you, it might not be second-nature. But I can help you get there if you’re new to this idea or if you’re just trying to cut back on your weekend spending.

Avoid the Mad Rush

Whether it’s to the bar, the mall, or to get food, you might feel a rush to just make some plans on Friday night. After all, if you work Monday to Friday, it’s only normal to want to celebrate the weekend. But before you go spend money you don’t have – or money that’s reserved for something else – just remind yourself that it’s ok to not make plans. It’s ok to not have plans. If you’re normally busy as a bee on Friday night, you can always make up for a lazy weekend if you feel like you have to by making plans with a friend to meet up for coffee during the week or having the lunch special during the week instead of dinner on Friday night.

coffee cup on wooden background

How to Save Money on Food Costs

To save money on a no-spend weekend, give some thought to how you’ll be dining. If you normally go to a bar on Friday night, try playing host in your own home. You could save some money, show off your cooking skills, and have a good time. One of the easiest ways you can help yourself is to learn the skill of couponing. Whether you’re an eligible bachelor or a mom of five, you can save a ton on your food and drink costs. While my time to coupon isn’t what it used to be, I still love getting products for free (or close to it) because of my couponing skills.

Free No-Spend Weekend Activities

In my hometown, there are museums, sports teams, casinos, and so much more. All these things could burn a hole through my wallet if I let them! But there are also free things to do – music events on college campuses, parks, walking trails, and a museum that has free daily admission (no catch, no kidding). The free events get less press than the paid ones, but it’s probably true that your town has something to do that’s free. The free events might be hard to find, but if there’s an arts-and-entertainment newspaper where you live, that’s a good start for locating free activities for your no-spend weekend.  Other activities on your docket could include:

  • Starting a blog (here on WordPress, you can do it for free)
  • Searching the internet for your favorite restaurant’s recipes, and cooking at home (not completely no-spend, but you gotta eat)
  • Binge watch a TV show, something you’ve never seen
  • Find something on Rotten Tomatoes that has an awful review. Try it, see if you can survive it!
  • De-clutter your closet and donate unwanted items to charity
  • Go walking or hiking
  • Visit family or friends
  • Go to church
  • Go to public library and check out some free stuff
  • Volunteer with a charity you care about

About This Blog: Please feel free to share any information from this site, in part or in full, giving credit to the author and providing a link to this website. Fearless Faith is a blog dedicated to family, faith and frugality. All content is copyright of the author unless otherwise indicated.

 

Just 18 Summers

https://i1.wp.com/files.tyndale.com/thpdata/images--covers/175_w/978-1-4143-8659-1.jpgHow much time do you have to spend with your child? You have Just 18 Summers, which is the essential message of this book by Rene Gutteridge and Michelle Cox. The novel weaves the lives of four families together. Each family is very different in their personality and the challenges they’re facing.

What the members of each adult member of the group – and what Gutteridge and Cox clearly want you to realize – is that it’s important to make the most of the time you have to influence, teach, love and enjoy your child. The four families in Just 18 Summers are at different phases of this journey, with children at different ages. This influences their thoughts as do their different priorities in life.

For the most part, the book was realistic, although some of the dialogue with the youngest character, Ava, seemed a bit unrealistic. She’s a young child and is portrayed as a bit mature for her age. There were some moments in the book when the spiritual element of the book seemed forced – as if, just to make sure there was no mistake, it was squeezed in so it comes across as unnatural in places. However, on the whole Just 18 Summers is a very enjoyable read that could cause anyone to re-evaluate their perspective on what’s important in life.

FTC Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for review purposes. This is my honest opinion about this book.

Beautiful on the Mountain by Jeannie Light: Book Review

https://i1.wp.com/files.tyndale.com/thpdata/images--covers/500%20h/978-1-4143-8713-0.jpgA rural church has been closed for years. It sits abandoned, and a request has been made for it to be re-opened. Poverty is a concern in this area but a spiritual leader’s guidance could unite people. Is an inexperienced person, with no theological training or pastoral experience, really the ideal person to get this rural church open?

This is the conflict in Jeannie Light’s Beautiful on the Mountain. But she isn’t judging someone else – she’s judging herself. While some comparisons have been made between this story and Catherine Marshall’s Christy, Beautiful on the Mountain takes place more recently and lacks the romantic element that Christy has. In Beautiful on the Mountain, Light feels guided to carry on from the smallest, most random circumstances.

Beautiful on the Mountain will appeal to those who are looking for an inspiring read. There is no singular climax, so it will also appeal to those who enjoy a realistic story that resembles real life.

FTC Disclosure: Tyndale House Publishers has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for review purposes.