Free How to Write a Resume Tips

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When is the last time you looked at your resume? If your resume has been tucked away somewhere, it may take a drastic effort to update it. You might be asking yourself, “How do I get a resume for free?” or “How do I write a resume?” If you’re more experienced and more confident with the art of writing, you might just be wondering how you can spruce things up a bit to show how qualified you are.

If you’ve pulled a free resume from the internet to use as a starting point, that may help if you have no idea to start. But, if you’re a more seasoned pro, you might just be looking for stronger words to make your resume stronger. You might be wondering how to show accomplishment through a resume.

Below are some tips and some prompts through words that can guide you, like a brainstorming exercise. I hope you find these helpful as you start, build, or strengthen your resume.

Words for Workers in Creative or Educational Fields

It can be hard to show how hard you’ve worked in a creative field. Is your resume showing what you’ve done? Maybe you’re a creative worker, such as a teacher, coach, musician, photographer, artist, or non-profit worker. Perhaps you work in several fields and are piecing together a living. Maybe what you do helps people a great deal, but the results are hard to measure. Do any of these words accurately describe your work? Action words such as:

  • Acted
  • Advised
  • Coached
  • Collaborated
  • Composed
  • Counseled
  • Created
  • Developed
  • Directed
  • Evaluated
  • Implemented
  • Organized
  • Photographed
  • Planned
  • Raised funds for
  • Wrote

Words for Workers in People-Centered Fields

Are your results contingent upon people? Do you build good relationships with others? Maybe what you do is not reliant upon strong knowledge of a thing but on how well you can motivate others and get them to do what you want. You might be a manager or a life coach. Consider action words such as:

  • Advised
  • Coached
  • Collaborated
  • Communicated
  • Developed
  • Implemented
  • Led
  • Mentored
  • Organized
  • Oversaw
  • Planned
  • Scheduled
  • Supervised

Words for Workers in Technical Fields

Does your job rely on a lot of technical expertise? Is it thing-oriented? Do you have to know a lot about a particular subject matter, something that requires years of study to master? Or perhaps you are a writer, scientist, or you work in the medical field. Maybe these ideas will work for you:

  • Collaborated
  • Developed
  • Drafted
  • Invented
  • Measured
  • Mentored
  • Organized
  • Piloted
  • Planned
  • Published
  • Researched
  • Studied
  • Trained
  • Treated

About This Blog: Please feel free to share any information from this site, in part or in full, giving credit to the author and providing a link to this website. Fearless Faith is a blog dedicated to family, faith and frugality. All views are the author’s own and content is copyright of the author unless otherwise indicated.

How to Have a No-Spend Weekend

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If you’re accustomed to celebrating every weekend by spending money, it can be a challenge to change your ways if money gets tight. But if you set your mind to it, you can have a no-spend weekend- a weekend that doesn’t involve spending any money.

I’m what some call a house cat. I love to stay home. I like to relax, and now that it’s fall, I love to stay cozy. So for me, a no-spend weekend is no problem. But for you, it might not be second-nature. But I can help you get there if you’re new to this idea or if you’re just trying to cut back on your weekend spending.

Avoid the Mad Rush

Whether it’s to the bar, the mall, or to get food, you might feel a rush to just make some plans on Friday night. After all, if you work Monday to Friday, it’s only normal to want to celebrate the weekend. But before you go spend money you don’t have – or money that’s reserved for something else – just remind yourself that it’s ok to not make plans. It’s ok to not have plans. If you’re normally busy as a bee on Friday night, you can always make up for a lazy weekend if you feel like you have to by making plans with a friend to meet up for coffee during the week or having the lunch special during the week instead of dinner on Friday night.

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How to Save Money on Food Costs

To save money on a no-spend weekend, give some thought to how you’ll be dining. If you normally go to a bar on Friday night, try playing host in your own home. You could save some money, show off your cooking skills, and have a good time. One of the easiest ways you can help yourself is to learn the skill of couponing. Whether you’re an eligible bachelor or a mom of five, you can save a ton on your food and drink costs. While my time to coupon isn’t what it used to be, I still love getting products for free (or close to it) because of my couponing skills.

Free No-Spend Weekend Activities

In my hometown, there are museums, sports teams, casinos, and so much more. All these things could burn a hole through my wallet if I let them! But there are also free things to do – music events on college campuses, parks, walking trails, and a museum that has free daily admission (no catch, no kidding). The free events get less press than the paid ones, but it’s probably true that your town has something to do that’s free. The free events might be hard to find, but if there’s an arts-and-entertainment newspaper where you live, that’s a good start for locating free activities for your no-spend weekend.  Other activities on your docket could include:

  • Starting a blog (here on WordPress, you can do it for free)
  • Searching the internet for your favorite restaurant’s recipes, and cooking at home (not completely no-spend, but you gotta eat)
  • Binge watch a TV show, something you’ve never seen
  • Find something on Rotten Tomatoes that has an awful review. Try it, see if you can survive it!
  • De-clutter your closet and donate unwanted items to charity
  • Go walking or hiking
  • Visit family or friends
  • Go to church
  • Go to public library and check out some free stuff
  • Volunteer with a charity you care about

About This Blog: Please feel free to share any information from this site, in part or in full, giving credit to the author and providing a link to this website. Fearless Faith is a blog dedicated to family, faith and frugality. All content is copyright of the author unless otherwise indicated.

 

Coming Soon: A Book Giveaway

Want to win a free book? Enter a giveaway here!

Start following my blog by July 10, and place a comment below this post that includes the phrase “I want a free book”.

One reader will be randomly selected to win a free, new, print copy of The Young Entrepreneur’s Guide to Starting & Running a Business by Steve Mariotti. If you’re the winner, you’ll be notified, and the book will be mailed to you via postal mail, at no charge to you. This giveaway is open to US residents only in the continental 48 United States. The winner’s name will be posted here.

 

 

 

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Just 18 Summers

https://i2.wp.com/files.tyndale.com/thpdata/images--covers/175_w/978-1-4143-8659-1.jpgHow much time do you have to spend with your child? You have Just 18 Summers, which is the essential message of this book by Rene Gutteridge and Michelle Cox. The novel weaves the lives of four families together. Each family is very different in their personality and the challenges they’re facing.

What the members of each adult member of the group – and what Gutteridge and Cox clearly want you to realize – is that it’s important to make the most of the time you have to influence, teach, love and enjoy your child. The four families in Just 18 Summers are at different phases of this journey, with children at different ages. This influences their thoughts as do their different priorities in life.

For the most part, the book was realistic, although some of the dialogue with the youngest character, Ava, seemed a bit unrealistic. She’s a young child and is portrayed as a bit mature for her age. There were some moments in the book when the spiritual element of the book seemed forced – as if, just to make sure there was no mistake, it was squeezed in so it comes across as unnatural in places. However, on the whole Just 18 Summers is a very enjoyable read that could cause anyone to re-evaluate their perspective on what’s important in life.

FTC Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for review purposes. This is my honest opinion about this book.